UT University Health Services

Medical Emergencies and After-Hours Care

Medical Emergencies

For severe or potentially life-threatening medical emergencies, even when UHS is open, call 911 or go to a hospital emergency room (ER).

Use a proximity search on your mobile device or desktop computer to find a hospital ER near you. If you are insured and circumstances allow, contact your insurance company to determine which hospital emergency rooms are in-network. We recommend doing this and saving the information in your phone before you have an emergency.

Mental Health Crisis

UT Austin students can call the Counseling and Mental Health Center’s 24-hour Crisis Line (512-471-2255) to speak with a crisis counselor.

What to do if you have had a known HIV exposure

Call the Nurse Advice Line (512-475-6877) immediately to be evaluated for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). PEP is only effective within the first 72 hours after exposure.

What to do in non-emergency situations when UHS is closed

*St. David’s Hospital triage nurses answer the Nurse Advice Line when UHS is closed. They cannot schedule UHS appointments, refer you to specific facilities or help you with medication refills or administrative issues.

Considerations when seeking care from urgent care facilities or hospital emergency rooms

The costs at healthcare facilities vary widely based on the type of facility and your insurance status. All costs are the patient's responsibility.

Many insurance plans only cover the costs of an emergency room visit in a true medical emergency. If you are insured, we strongly encourage you to contact your plan before you need care to determine which local urgent care and emergency facilities are in-network with your insurance plan.

The following chart outlines general cost considerations and other differences between urgent care and emergency facilities.

  Urgent Care (UC) Facilities Hospital Emergency Rooms (ERs)
General Scope of Care (See examples of conditions treated below.)
  • Treats many non-severe, non-life-threatening acute conditions
  • Many can perform x-rays
  • Can run basic diagnostic lab tests (e.g. strep throat, urinary tract infections, etc.)

  • Treats severe or life-threatening conditions
  • More sophisticated equipment and capabilities (e.g. advanced imaging, extensive lab, surgical facilities, etc.)
  • Many have specialists on staff
Access to Hospital Care
  • Usually free-standing
  • Not physically part of a hospital

  • Usually physically part of a hospital with easy transfer to advanced care or admission
Hours of Operation
  • Usually open late with weekend/holiday hours

  • Open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year
Wait Time
  • Typically, shorter than ERs
  • Usually see patients on first come, first served basis

  • Can be significantly longer than UCs.
  • See patients in order of severity
Cost
  • Significantly less than ERs
  • Some insurance plans consider UC visits to be a “specialist” visit with a higher co-pay charged
  • Patient portion for payment expected at time of visit

  • Much higher than UC charges
  • Some insurance plans have a higher co-pay for ER visits
  • Many insurance plans will not pay for ER visits made for non-emergency conditions that could be treated at a UC
  • ERs often send bills after time of treatment
Examples of Conditions Treated (not exhaustive lists)
  • Flu symptoms
  • Fever with a rash
  • Bronchitis or severe cough with fever
  • Sprains or minor fractures
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Minor cuts requiring stitches
  • Animal or insect bites
  • Urinary tract infection

  • Sudden changes in vision
  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Paralysis
  • Severe or persistent vomiting or diarrhea
  • Severe head or eye injuries
  • Serious burns
  • Dizziness, weakness or confusion
  • Severe chest pain or pressure or irregular heartbeat
  • Sudden testicular pain or swelling
  • Coughing up or vomiting blood
  • Profuse sweating
  • Severe physical trauma
Urgent Care (UC) Facilities
General Scope of Care
  • Treats many non-severe, non-life-threatening acute conditions
  • Many can perform x-rays
  • Can run basic diagnostic lab tests (e.g. strep throat, urinary tract infections, etc.)
Access to Hospital Care
  • Usually free-standing
  • Not physically part of a hospital
Hours of Operation
  • Usually open late with weekend/holiday hours
Wait Time
  • Typically, shorter than ERs
  • Usually see patients on first come, first served basis
Cost
  • Significantly less than ERs
  • Some insurance plans consider UC visits to be a “specialist” visit with a higher co-pay charged
  • Patient portion for payment expected at time of visit
Examples of Conditions Treated (not exhaustive lists)
  • Flu symptoms
  • Fever with a rash
  • Bronchitis or severe cough with fever
  • Sprains or minor fractures
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Minor cuts requiring stitches
  • Animal or insect bites
  • Urinary tract infection
Hospital Emergency Rooms (ERs)
General Scope of Care
  • Treats severe or life-threatening conditions
  • More sophisticated equipment and capabilities (e.g. advanced imaging, extensive lab, surgical facilities, etc.)
  • Many have specialists on staff
Access to Hospital Care
  • Usually physically part of a hospital with easy transfer to advanced care or admission
Hours of Operation
  • Open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year
Wait Time
  • Can be significantly longer than UCs.
  • See patients in order of severity
Cost
  • Much higher than UC charges
  • Some insurance plans have a higher co-pay for ER visits
  • Many insurance plans will not pay for ER visits made for non-emergency conditions that could be treated at a UC
  • ERs often send bills after time of treatment
Examples of Conditions Treated (not exhaustive lists)
  • Sudden changes in vision
  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Paralysis
  • Severe or persistent vomiting or diarrhea
  • Severe head or eye injuries
  • Serious burns
  • Dizziness, weakness or confusion
  • Severe chest pain or pressure or irregular heartbeat
  • Sudden testicular pain or swelling
  • Coughing up or vomiting blood
  • Profuse sweating
  • Severe physical trauma

Helpful Links

UHS Urgent Care
Appointments
Counseling and Mental Health Center 24-hour Crisis Line



hours Monday - Friday 8am - 5pm by appointment Monday - Friday, 8am to 5pm
by appointment
512) 471-4955 (512) 471-4955
email uhs Email UHS

University Health Services is committed to providing high-quality care to patients of all ages, races, ethnicities, physical abilities or attributes, religions, sexual orientations, or gender identities/expression.

LOCATION

100 West Dean Keeton
Student Services Building (SSB)

FOLLOW US

go here to access our facebook channel go here to access our twitter channel go here to access our instagram channel


SPECIFIC QUESTIONS?

Incoming Students
International Students
Dell Medical Students
LGBTQIA+ Inclusive Healthcare
Parents
Faculty and Staff


CAMPUS PARTNERS

40 Acres Pharmacy
Counseling and Mental Health Center

university of texas at austin university health services
university of texas at austin division of student affairs